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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
everything in the press that has been written, and they feel that the november trip to the u.n. was so successful that they are willing to go to the icc. when you say that israel may build this bottleneck area linking north and south, they say, fine. the more palestinians you talk to who believe that it is either final status or bust, and buss means the u.n., and not interested in any sort of coordinated unilateral agreement, it is a dirty word there, you are really seeing confidence. i personally hope the president in his stay over there is able to talk to the president over there and speak to them about the limitations of that strategy two could go to the icc. israelis say they're going to the icc. that could tie them up for years in legal proceedings. i do not see how any of this brings peace. i'm concerned about it. i'm also concerned about decision making, i'm concerned about the isolation of prime minister fayyat. the palestinian press does not report on his activities anymore. on the one hand, the good news is that more money has arrived lately. since obama is coming, of course
are not between doing nothing and doing everything. if the president moved more swiftly and not gone to the u.n. three times, and had a mother may i situation which the russians of course blocked, we might have been able to prevent an early -- a long, rather, prolonged fight and now we have 5,000 jihadis all overseer yeah. had we moved more swiftly to drop the preposterous positions and, to aid and outreach and secular elements early not we wouldn't be in a situation where we have 5,000 jihadis and the lesson is not never do anything, the answer is, american leadership is crucial in that part of the region. that part of the world. now, with regard to turkey and israel, i sure hope that netanyahu got something good for this. what he did was apologize for defending israel. the u.n. of all places, passed a report, put out a report, saying that israel was justified in self-defense and justified -- >> quickly, was the three -- three years ago, a turkish ship with peace people and adriati a tried to breach the blockade and to reach the palestinians and, israelis killed people. >> and people were ther
between 1980-1988 with the iranians. a regime that invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society, while at the same time strengthening the criminalize networked associate with saddam that really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on iraq's communities, how they have become pitted against each other, how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction on his own people, the kurds in the north, and how he had persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake oof the 1991-92 gulf war. and so, and also other factors associated with his return to face initiatives and the use of really so lofty jihadi ideologies to return peoples frustrations away from his regime and towards the west and israel and so forth. in the context of his conspiracy. the effect that had on iraqi society. so understanding that human dimension of conflict and in particular understanding local conflicts that could occur, how these tribal ethnic, sectarian competition for power and resources to play out. and
is a suspect to embargo. -- is subject to u.n. embargo. there is so much at stake here, if you could -- what specific leverage might the united states employed in those direct discussions that are taking place with the iraqis? intodo not want to go great detail here about our discussions with iraqis. we have discussed the united states resolution with the iraqis. in a sense, in the end, what matters is the government of iraq understand that its own interests will be best served not by facilitating the iranian efforts to prolong the crisis in syria, but rather in bringing about a transitional government that will have good relations with the government in iraq. >> understanding by the iraqi government would be helpful. action by the iraqi government would be necessary to ensure this takes place. i would like to focus on two types of aid. one is military. there is a difference of opinion here on capitol hill. about whether or not provide direct military assistance to the opposition. the argument is made that it is really hard to know where these weapons are going, that they might wind up in th
for defending israel. the u.n. of all places passed a report, put out a report saying that israel was justified in self-defense and they were justified in in. >> chris: three years ago a turkish ship with people and aid activists tried to breach the israeli block kade of gaza to bring supplies to the palestinians in gaza and the israelis raided it and ended up killing nine of the people. >> that was not just peace and humanitarian people. they had weapons and attacked threw israeli soldeddiers into the sea. the u.n. issued a report saying israel had a right to defend itself and maintain that block kade. now, the president leaned on israel to issue some type of apology. did they get something in return? i hope so. otherwise it looks like obama is leaning on the israelis. bad signal to the rest of the region. >> chris: with all of the focus on syria and iran there was relatively little talk about the prospects for a peace deal between the israelis and palestinians but the president did address it in this speech in jerusalem. >> iit is possible. it is possible. i'm not saying it is guaranteed. i c
, if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, down the route of international organizations, that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. so let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i didn't mention on the israeli side -- i said there was a cop -- convergence on syria. there will be a discussion. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position, and it's hard to imagine, even if it's not a much of a public dimension, it's hard to imagine that's not going to be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but also a focus on this, and what if anything we in the international community can be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say, with jordan, you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all,ing in is a signal of interest which is i think important. here the private dimension has to focus as much as anything on syria. you have 400,000 syrian refugees in jordan today. 100 thon additional since the begin of this year. if the pac
to go down the u.n. road, the route of moving and international organizations, that is not road that will lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i did not mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria, but there will be private discussions on syria in israel. there'll be a private discussion with palestinians on israel as well. you have four hundred thousand palestinians in syria who are in a very vulnerable position. imagine that that is not currently part of a private conversation. sure, there'll be a focus on peace, but there will also be a focus on this. what are we doing to safeguard the palestinians that are there? goingordan, you're also to have a public and private pension. englander sends a signal of interest, which it is important, but the private pension has to focus on syria as well. you have four hundred thousand assyrian refugees in jordan today. 100,000 additional since the beginning of this year. if that pace continues, you could have 700,000 by june. the impact on jordan is actually very hard to cont
viewed as contentious visits by iran's president to new york. the visits to the u.n. were often laced with intrigue and tension and one had an errant gunshot mixed in. according to a new book that tells of an incident in new york involving iran's president, mahmoud ahmadinejad. the book said it happened in 20 2006. but the author now acknowledges it was in 2007. the book says when u.s. secret service personnel were standing by in or near their vehicles at a staging area in new york, a secret service agent in an apparent accident discharged his shotgun as iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad was loading his motorcade. no one was hurt and co-author mark said ahmadinejad didn't come close to getting hit with the bullet. but -- >> my understanding is from the bush administration officials, who looked into it at the time, is that ahmadinejad was aware of it. certainly heard the shot. and, you know, was surprised by it. but kind of looked asconce a little bit anded walked and got into his car. >> reporter: he said iranian security personnel were nearby as well and noticed it. he says that'
with him that says, you know if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, if you want to continue to go down the route of moving on the international organizations that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. you know i didn't mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria but there will certainly be a private discussion on syria and israel. there will be a private discussion with abu mazen on syria as well. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position and it's hard to imagine even if that is not much of a public dimension for the conversation it is hard to imagine that will not be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but there will also be a focus on this and what if anything we in the international community could be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say with jordan you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all just being there sends a signal of
in the u.n. or the international criminal court. >> we'll see whacomes out. and then john kerry is going to follow up on this. but i suspect that from the way that the wording is coming out there may be a softening of positions on both sides on this in terms of settlement. a restraining settlement activity. >> rose: and palestinian initiatives in the u.n.. >> right. >> rose: okay. the last one is empower secretary of state kerry. >> he hasn't done that yet. he really needs to do it because he's given this speech which has raised expectations sky-high about what the united states is going to do in the peace process. and if he doesn't back kerry up, because kerry is the one that is going to be doing it, kerry won't be able to succeed. >> my guess is knowing secretary kerry and knowing secretary clinton, that secretary kerry will give this because he passionately is interested in this more tension, individually on his own, than secretary clinton. >> he says it that the time, sorry, that the time for middlest envoy is over. >> he is a secretary that is widely prceived as being verylose to th
? some syrian rebels have been designated as foreign terrorist organizations. they have captured u.n. peacekeepers after being released later. the u.s. must take necessary precautions and due diligence. can you give us more information about the opposition? they are not just syrian national. who are far and fighters have the islamic militants from neighboring countries. post-asidevern in a syria? on weapons of mass destruction, are reports correct the syrian regime might possess up to 50 tons of weapons-grade nuclear materials in its stockpile? true, willports are the u.s. call for an emergency meeting to discuss this and if assad does not grant inspectors immediate access to all nuclear facilities and stockpiles so they can be protected, will the u.s. impose and mediate, comprehensive, and painful sanctions? will we do sell acting with the european union? lastly, on the countries that are aiding the brutality of regime, these countries continue to provide military assistance, weaponry, and they seek to further the illegal weapons program in supporting these foreign terrorist organiz
costly war between 1980 and 1988 with the iranians. a regime that had invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society while at the same time strengthening the criminalize patronage networks associated with so there really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on the community's poorer but they have become pitted against each other. how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction of his own people, the kurds in the north and how he persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake of the 91-92 gulf war. and also other factors associated with his return tough trade initiatives and the use of really appear 11 ideology to turn people's frustrations away from the regime in toward the west and israel and so forth. the context of the crusader conspiracy. in fact the fact that had on the iraqi society. so understanding that the human dimension and in particular understanding global conflict that could occur, how these trouble ethnic sectarian competition for power resources woul
line? last september at the u.n. netanyahu said it was spring or summer, that deadline is approaching, what happens there? >> there's a gulf between what the prime minister articulated was the red line and the president said we have a year. so that is where i think a lot of discussions that are happening now will crackcracklet is the difference, and what they will discuss. he said don't worry to israel leaders, as martin said and the president said, i have your back, even if you do not believe you have the capabilities to deal with iran crossing what you perceive as your red line, we have the capability. and the prime minister preempted that, and he said united states is a great friend and mr. president, you are a great friend, but even to great friends we cannot trust the fate of our security. >> this is a coming together. so things are a little better. syria, president obama said today, use of chemical weapons in syria would be quote unquota game changer and i have to believe he is serious about that. >> what is your take on it? >> to comment on dan and iran, i think it's important,
americans. i really don't think obama went over there to broker any peace deals. netanyahu went to the u.n. and he laid out the time line. he mentioned it was this spring. >> sean: red line? >> he is playing catch-up and for the president to be doing that is embarrassing. he is icing words through weakness. he is not using peace through strength. >> sean: national security for oil. look at north dakota, 3% unemployment. >> i think that obama did something, two good things. one, is to publicly recognize the jewish state and the roots of the jews and religion which was important for the rest of the world. >> sean: is that really so good? >> so for him to say that, it was a good things. and now, he wants the palestinians to recognize the jewish state. this is not going to happen. >> sean: i wanted to get your reaction? >> i spent a good amount of time in israel just over a month ago talking with their ministers and talking with the people. they are guarded. that is the only way i can say. they are guarded about american leadership and they understand our culture. we talk about the red line an
. if the u.s. provides $3 billion to israel and it's vetoed out of the u.n. security council this it's unwilling to take us to the finish line and i think we need to internationalize this issue. that's the palestinian responsibility to international jaz it. there's clear support in the u.n. general assembly to do more and better than the u.s. has been able to do. >> again one of the reasons i was so pleased with what we saw with what president obama said and with what the world hear president obama say he severely explained this is what the united states policy is. it begins with israeli children and palestinian children. deserve a better future. how we going give to it them. second the way to do that is two states side-by-side and then third the way to get to two states is the through direct negotiations. you may not agree with that third step. i hope people will. but the fact is we start with what's the best way to achieve what israeli and palestinian parents want for their children and one another. >> is that perfect example of the dual role. the position of direct negotiations is
resolution that gets voted on at the u.n. as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that you, that we were discussing. we went to paris, we went to paris, egypt and then tunis. and it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, you know, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want, or we can actually try to shape this into something that is going to deliver people. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it's might be the most, i think, historical. >> guest: yes. i love that chapter. >> host: and just talk about what made that trip so unique. obviously, not very many people are traveling to burma at least from the united states at that time. >> guest: more and more, but certainly at the time it was very, very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to, um, when you look at the big picture of what, you know, my book will do for readers, this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my persona
to protect civilians. that's the final resolution that gets voted on at the u.n., as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that we were discussing, we went to paris. we went to paris, egypt and into this. it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want or we can try to shape us into something that is going to deliver. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it might be the most historical. >> guest: i love that chapter. >> host: just talk about what made that trip so unique. obvious that not very many people have gone to burma. >> guest: more and more of a string of the time it was very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to when you look at the big picture of what, no, my book will do for readers. is this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my personal story, my perspective on american power. it is the story of hillary clinton as secretary of state and
eastern countries but in terms of world opinion. look at the vote in the u.n. when we made every single effort possible to discourage countries from voting in favor of palestinian membership in the u.n. how many votes out of 190, out of 190 did we get? we found only seven countries to support us. this tells us something. and, therefore, we have to be very, very clear inning on ourselves what are our interests, how do we promote them? and we make it clear to the israelis on decisions of war and peace that involve us, namely, particularly in regards to iran, we are the ones who make the decisions. >> senator coons, a fairly interesting appearing yesterday of two united states senators, john mccain and carl levin of michigan in urging the administration to consider tougher steps with regard to syria. and when you hear repeatedly the phrase about chemical weapons perhaps being used in syria, the shadow of iraq seems to come back to many people. weapons of mass destruction. what is your sense within the united states senate right now about that shadow that got us into iraq lurking over any p
the consumer. >> reporter: dramatic reductions came not through carbon tax or u.n. mandate, private sector forces and technologies greens oppose. >> process of fracking natural gas creates a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. >> reporter: so they oppose high i can fracturing because the more natural gas, lower the price. longer it would take before wind and solar replace fossil fuels and are cost competitive. back to you. heather: william la jeunesse, live for us, thank you. bill: the spring season pull ad houdini. where did it go? a a major snow storm is battling the midwest. that is look at white stuff throughout the country. tough going out there. it was supposed to be spring right? heather: old man winter has not given up. >> all i heard was we would have snow. i didn't hear how much we were getting. this is quite a lot. >> is this frustrating. this is march or spring. >> every year seems like it is like this. so just have to relax. bill: here we go on the 25th of march. snow records have been shattered, yet another spring storm burying parts of the country and taking its
weapons. there are measures we have called for, and we know the u.n. is moving forward with investigations on exactly what happened. i have said publicly that the use of chemical weapons by the assad regime would be a game changer from our perspective. because, once you let that's the situation spend out of control, it is very hard to stop and that will have enormous spillover effects across the region. and so, we are going to continue to closely consult with everybody across the region and do everything we can to break -- bring an end to the bloodshed and to allow the syrian people to get out from under a leader who was lost all legitimacy because he is willing to slaughter his own people. he will be replaced. it is not a question of if. it is when. part of what we have to think about is what is the aftermath going to affect? and by the way, we need to think about that in a way that serves the syrian people from all walks of life, from all religious affiliations. because one of the things we know about this region is that if we fail the -- to create a model in the arab world in which peop
contributor and former u.s. ambassador to the united nations, john bolton. rick grinell and rick burns, a former ambassador to n.a.t.o. and secretary under president clinton and now you've got president obama morsi discussing the collapse of egypt. and that's something we don't want over here and that's one of the reasons we're keeping an eye over there. >> i don't see the prospect of the state collapsing, but i think that morsi's actions showed why people feared having a muslim brotherhood government in power, that it would be a one person, one vote, one time experience, and i have to say, the fact that the military so far is silent, could indicate they're prepared to acquiesce in this. although people have said that the brotherhood and the military could never come to an agreement on rule in egypt. i've always believed that's a possibility. so i think this is very, very serious and it's one reason i favor suspending both economic and military aid to egypt until this gets resolved. >> rick, where is this going? because you know, they got rid of hosni mubarak out there because he was d
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)